EA Summit: ZapThink Roadmap for SOA Adoption
Companies seeking to implement IT infrastructures that enable business agility have found that service-oriented architectures (SOA) based on Web services provide a cost-effective approach. This workshop provides companies of all sizes and industries with a detailed plan for SOA adoption, including the steps and phases by which companies can move from today’s brittle infrastructures to loosely-coupled asynchronous applications and systems. The session covers concepts in point-to-point Web services implementations for integration; securing, managing, and adding process layers to these services; implementing registries and management for loose coupling; moving to asynchronous invocations for greater reliability; and concepts in virtualization, grid computing, and more. [hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Teros: Securing Web Services Data and Interfaces
As systems become more distributed and abstracted through Web Services-based SOAs and other means, it becomes increasingly difficult for a company to gain adequate knowledge of their vulnerabilities and the level to which their systems are exposed. In addition, companies must safeguard the data that is transmitted between systems. In the case of Web Services, this data is known as the “payload” that is transmitted within and between organizations. Teros leverages a history of providing deep content inspection for traditional Web applications that is apropos for solving Web Services payload and interface security challenges. The Teros Web Services Security Gateway applies application learning to implement enhanced security controls on application inputs.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Information as a Service: Service-Oriented Information Integration
As organizations grow organically, they often implement multiple systems that contain information that is redundant, conflicting, or distributed across their organization. As such, the seemingly simple task of trying to gain a single view of the information contained in the enterprise is a significant challenge. The requirement for single view, aggregated views, or shared information cuts cross the value chain from sales leads, orders, to products, inventory — including e-government initiatives in public safety, health and defense. While many application integration approaches attempt to solve this disparate information challenge by removing the barriers to accessing information, the challenge still remains of how to gain intelligence from the disparate data in the enterprise. Previous approaches to information integration have fallen short. Tightly coupled data or application integration approaches that mandate point-to-point connections between systems are too brittle to handle continuously changing business requirements. Message buses and business process management approaches…

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NexaWeb: Rich Client for High Performance Web Services
Two of the often conflicting desires in IT is the need on the one hand for rich user interfaces that maximize a user’s productivity and on the other hand, the desire to decentralize computing so that a user can gain access to the widest base of IT assets at the lowest possible cost. These two forces are at odds because rich client interfaces, until recently, have only been possible in certain limited scenarios in which the business logic and computing resources were combined with the interface. However, a new class of presentation layer is emerging. This rich client interface to Web Services provides an end user experience that is similar to client/server applications, with a rich graphical user interface, responsive performance and highly interactive functionality. In this vein, Nexaweb provides a software platform that combines the richness of client/server and desktop applications with the ability to interact with high-performance,…

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Resurrecting the VAN: The Web Services Network
Both software vendors and enterprise end-users have always looked to make business-to-business interactions automated, reliable, and secure. While many companies currently seek a set of products and specifications that improve B2B interactions, many large firms will tell you that they’ve been accomplishing the goals of reliable, secure, guaranteed interaction between companies for decades, in the form of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI). However, it’s not EDI’s technology (which today is both arcane and obsolete), but rather its infrastructure that’s given it such longevity. We’re talking about the Value-Added Network (VAN) here — a set of capabilities offered by third-party network providers to guarantee the required level of interaction between any two participants on the network. A Third-Party “Network” for Web Services In the 1980s, companies found that their primary challenge in trying to automate their business connections was managing point-to-point electronic relationships with dozens or even hundreds of suppliers.

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Service Orientation Market Trends
Key Points: ZapThink sees a consolidation of most SO functionality into a single market category that can be delivered as individual products, product suites, or service offerings that contain broad functionality, including features that are currently associated with the security, management, process, integration, and tools segments. We call that market the SOA Implementation Framework market. The total SOA Implementation Framework market opportunity will go from $4.4 billion in 2005 to $43 billion by 2010. The big winners from the shift to Service Orientation will be large vendors who are able to leverage the innovation of the smaller players to build fully functional SOA Implementation Frameworks. New entrants will find opportunity in adding value to these large vendors’ products, or by finding opportunity in the gaps between their solutions.   Table of Contents: I. Report Scope II. Context: The Shift to Service Orientation 2.1. The shift to Service Orientation affects all…

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A Guide to Securing XML and Web Services
The quantity of XML crossing the enterprise network is dramatically increasing as the range and depth of uses that companies find for XML grows. This torrent of XML traffic offers substantial business value to enterprises, but it also offers a new set of risks. Companies are using Web Services today to facilitate integration with their most important systems, but XML, the heart of Web Services, is by its nature an open, human-readable format, and as a result offers little in the way of inherent security. It is critically important, therefore, for companies to secure their XML and Web Services traffic before they experience serious compromises to their enterprise IT security. The existing traditional security infrastructure is inadequate to satisfy the security needs that XML and Web Services present. Companies must optimize their security infrastructure with centralized XML and Web Services security policy definition and control. Organizations must also focus…

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Is the Window of Opportunity Closing for Service Orientation Vendors?
Speaking of the ever-changing nature of reality, the ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus famously said, “you can never step into the same river twice.” He could very well have been talking about the Web Services (WS) and Service Orientation (SO) market. At this point in time, this market is exceptionally dynamic, as several technology and business forces buffet the players. ZapThink’s new report, Service Orientation Market Trends, analyzes these forces, and lays out some bold predictions for the IT industry for the years to come. This ZapFlash is an excerpt of that report. Web Services, of course, are standards-based interfaces to software functionality. Service Orientation is an approach to distributed computing where software functionality is available as discoverable Services on the network. It’s important to realize that Web Services by themselves do not form a product category in their own right, because they are interfaces to something else, rather…

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Retiring the Four-Platform Framework for Web Services
As an analyst firm, ZapThink sees many presentations from vendors and end users, and as a result we have seen a recurring vision for Web Services that has outlived its questionable usefulness at representing how the market is implementing and producing products for real-world Web Services and SOA solutions — namely Gartner’s Four-Platform Framework of Web Services. While the framework has helped many companies get started with their understanding of Web Services, we believe it’s time to move on. Fundamentally, the way in which the Four-Platform Framework is represented by vendors and end-users is inaccurate, incomplete, and in the final analysis, no longer helpful for either end-users or vendors as they struggle to grasp Web Services or Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs). In its place, ZapThink offers the SOA Implementation Framework, which we feel more accurately reflects the challenges companies face as they seek to implement SOAs, and the products vendors must…

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Ascential Software Brings Enterprise Data Integration Expertise to OASIS
Connecting systems within the enterprise as well as with suppliers, partners and customers is paramount for today’s enterprise,” said Ron Schmelzer, senior analyst at ZapThink, an IT market intelligence firm that provides advice and insight into XML, Web services, and Service Orientation. “Web services offer a new approach to solving integration challenges by leveraging the widespread adoption of standards for system-to-system communication. Ascential Software is taking full advantage of this trend and leads the market in delivering service-based solutions. The company, a 2003 ZapThought Leader, has transformed enterprise data integration by extending its data profiling, quality and transformation capabilities to Web services and SOAs.” Read more at: Ascential Press Release…

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