Nexaweb: Exploring the Universal Consumer for Services and Platform for Rich Enterprise Applications
In place of stateless Web interactions that offer only a cheap imitation of the interactivity we’ve come to expect from our desktop operating systems, a new class of distributed applications is emerging — the Rich Internet Application (RIA). Combining real-time user interaction with rich user interface capabilities, Rich Internet Applications leverage increasingly sophisticated client-side technology to enable users to interact with and compose functionality from distributed applications no matter where they are located on the network. Nexaweb evolves the RIA with significant enhacements to their product line. Nexaweb Platform 4.5 adds the Universal Client Framework — a way of rendering client-side capabilities in Ajax, Java, and even .NET on an as-needed basis, combined with reliable, asynchronous, and sometimes-connected modes of interaction provided by their Internet Messaging Bus (IMB) and Event Notification Services (ENS). [hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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How Service Orientation will Change your Business
Describing Service Orientation and SOA in business terms is extremely difficult. Jason and Ronald have succeeded, and their book has become a global bestseller. They describe a new way of thinking about business and its processes related to Zachman Framework. This presentation was given at the DAMA Conference in Stockholm, Sweden, on Nov. 13, 2006. 36-slide PowerPoint in pdf format.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Organizational Adoption of SOA Best Practices
Organizational issues of SOA, understanding SOA from the business perspective, and lowering the risk of SOA implementations. This presentation was presented at a WM-data seminar in Copenhagen, Denmark on November 14, 2006. 53-slide PowerPoint in pdf format.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Subscribe Today to Get Access![/hide]…

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SOA and Web Services
Role of standards Web Services — Standardizing Services Web Services vs. SOA This presentation as given at a seminar for Tarantell in Oslo, Norway, on November 16, 2006. 40-slide PowerPoint in pdf format. [hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Subscribe Today to Get Access![/hide]…

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Presentations from ZapThink’s Fifth SOA Practitioner’s Forum in Geneva, Switzerland
In this ZIP file, you will find the collection of presentations from ZapThink’s Fifth SOA Practitioner’s Forum in Geneva, Switzerland. Presentations include: Fundamental SOA Concepts – Ronald Schmelzer, ZapThink [E] SOA, Business Process, and BPM – Jean-Paul de Vooght, CTP [E] Real implementation cases of SOA – Malhar Kamdar, BEA [F] The ESB as SOA Infrastructure: Controlling SOA at Runtime – Claus Thoden, BEA [E] Measuring SOA Maturity and the Platform – Xavier Fournier-Morel, SQLi [F] Enterprise Web 2.0 – David McFarlane, Nexaweb [E] How to move your Legacy Host to SOA – Ido Hardonag, NetManage [E] SOA Architectural Deep Dive – Ron Schmelzer, ZapThink [E] The download is about 11 Megabytes, and you need to provide your permission to share contact information with event sponsors to download this file.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Mobility and SOA – A Technology Perspective
Mobility is the desire to both be able to access information and applications no matter the location and no matter the device or technology used to access that information. In the past, mobility represented yet another challenge for IT. However, in the Service-oriented context, Mobility is actually an aspect of how a proper SOA will work. Indeed, Mobility represents a new set of requirements for Service Consumption as well as a new class of Service providers. This presentation outlines the technical considerations for what Mobility is and how it relates to SOA, and what the business needs to think about in linking these two concepts together. This includes a discussion of Ajax, Service Consumption approahces, and other key technology issues. This was presented at the SCO World conference in Las Vegas on August 8, 2006. MobilitySOA-Technology-ZTP-0246…

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REST and Web Services: The ZapThink Take
Question: what do you call two or more architects in a room? Answer: an argument. Now that Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is the topic du jour within many such rooms in enterprises today, one favorite argument is over Representational State Transfer (REST) and its relationship to Web Services. Many such discussions degenerate into a religious discussion over which approach is better, but as with most arguments in the SOA space, the reality is far more subtle. Up until now, ZapThink has been happy to stay on the sidelines of this battle, but the time has come for us to weigh in with the ZapThink take on the REST vs. Web Services debate. The Context for REST and Web Services This perennial debate centers on a core challenge of SOA: what is the best way to create a loosely-coupled Service interface? One approach is the style of distributed computing known as…

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SOA for Independent Software Vendors (ISVs)
As Enterprise Architecture, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is particularly useful in large enterprises, and increasingly, to small and midsize businesses, as well. However, those are only one part of the IT ecosystem. What about those companies that are in the business of building and selling software products, so called independent software vendors (ISVs)? Generally speaking, ISVs create and sell software products that run on one or more IT platforms. ISVs might offer consulting services, but they typically aren’t consulting companies per se. Neither are they simply Value-Added Resellers (VARs) or Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), who embed or customize someone else’s products. Rather, ISVs sell their own intellectual property as installable, configurable software. The largest software vendors are responsible for the enterprise applications that we run, the operating systems we use, and the infrastructure platforms on top of which we conduct business — think IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, HP, and CA.

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StrikeIron: Taking the Complexity out of Service Consumption
The traditional route for most independent software or hardware vendors (ISVs) to differentiate their application functionality is to build or acquire functionality and then integrate it tightly into their own offerings. However, over time, this approach leads to substantial complexity and brittleness as customer requirements and business objectives change. The introduction of Web Services and Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) offers ISVs a new opportunity to add functionality to their offerings without having to build or acquire that technology and then go through a painful technology merging process. The ability to consume third-party Services that other vendors provide is a new capability that ISVs should explore as they continue to seek differentiation for their offerings. In this ZapNote, we explore the idea of embedding third-party Services within ISV offerings and how to do so without adding to their complexity. [hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this…

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