Thinking Outside the SOA Box
Today, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is finally off the ground. Most organizations are past the basic planning stage, and are now actively constructing their SOA implementations. Much work remains, to be sure; standards are incomplete, tools are immature, and companies continue to struggle with the political, cultural, and technical challenges that architectural change presents. Be that as it may, SOA has turned the corner in many ways: we’re now focusing more on consuming Services than building them, issues of governance have risen to the fore, and organizations are finally working through the complexities of SOA quality. But perhaps the most interesting sign that SOA has reached a new level of maturity are the early indications that the focus on SOA as something separate from the rest of IT is waning as Service-Oriented best practices gradually become accepted more broadly as general IT best practices. The fact that the spotlight of…

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Presentations from ZapThink’s Fifth SOA Practitioner’s Forum in Geneva, Switzerland
In this ZIP file, you will find the collection of presentations from ZapThink’s Fifth SOA Practitioner’s Forum in Geneva, Switzerland. Presentations include: Fundamental SOA Concepts – Ronald Schmelzer, ZapThink [E] SOA, Business Process, and BPM – Jean-Paul de Vooght, CTP [E] Real implementation cases of SOA – Malhar Kamdar, BEA [F] The ESB as SOA Infrastructure: Controlling SOA at Runtime – Claus Thoden, BEA [E] Measuring SOA Maturity and the Platform – Xavier Fournier-Morel, SQLi [F] Enterprise Web 2.0 – David McFarlane, Nexaweb [E] How to move your Legacy Host to SOA – Ido Hardonag, NetManage [E] SOA Architectural Deep Dive – Ron Schmelzer, ZapThink [E] The download is about 11 Megabytes, and you need to provide your permission to share contact information with event sponsors to download this file.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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SOA: Enabling the Long Tail of IT
The forty-year history of IT has followed a pendulum, swinging from centralized computing (mainframe timesharing), to decentralized (client/server), and back to centralized (Web/n-tier architectures with thin browser clients). Now the pendulum is swinging back to decentralized IT, with the emergence of advanced, collaborative, and richly interactive applications under the banners of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web 2.0, making possible a dizzying array of new business opportunities and technologies that catch the fancy of entrepreneurs, developers, and dreamers everywhere. While the first decade or so of the Web, not even casually referred to as Web 1.0, continues to have a significant impact on the way that companies run their business and make money, it doesn’t threaten the current power or structure of the IT organization as much as the newer movement to SOA and Web 2.0 have the potential to do. The swing back to decentralization encouraged by Service Orientation…

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Mobility and SOA – A Technology Perspective
Mobility is the desire to both be able to access information and applications no matter the location and no matter the device or technology used to access that information. In the past, mobility represented yet another challenge for IT. However, in the Service-oriented context, Mobility is actually an aspect of how a proper SOA will work. Indeed, Mobility represents a new set of requirements for Service Consumption as well as a new class of Service providers. This presentation outlines the technical considerations for what Mobility is and how it relates to SOA, and what the business needs to think about in linking these two concepts together. This includes a discussion of Ajax, Service Consumption approahces, and other key technology issues. This was presented at the SCO World conference in Las Vegas on August 8, 2006. MobilitySOA-Technology-ZTP-0246…

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Rich Internet Applications Based on Ajax, Flash, and Java Will Quickly Supplant Current Static Web Applications and Portals
BALTIMORE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–July 25, 2006–ZapThink released a report today showing that demand for Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) and more sophisticated user interaction is increasing dramatically. RIAs provide an end user experience that combines the experience that users are most familiar with in desktop and client/server applications, such as rich graphical user interface, responsive performance and highly interactive functionality, with the scalability, distribution, and manageability benefits that Internet applications provide. The report entitled “Rich Internet Applications: Market Technologies and Trends” shows that Rich Internet Applications will continue to gain prominence in the enterprise, with companies spending more than $500 million on RIA applications by 2011. “Users today increasingly demand more from their online user experiences,” said Ronald Schmelzer, senior analyst with ZapThink. “The convergence of SOA and Web 2.0 are leading organizations to retire their static Web pages and inflexible portal applications. Today’s set the bar for user interactivity higher than…

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SOA for Independent Software Vendors (ISVs)
As Enterprise Architecture, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is particularly useful in large enterprises, and increasingly, to small and midsize businesses, as well. However, those are only one part of the IT ecosystem. What about those companies that are in the business of building and selling software products, so called independent software vendors (ISVs)? Generally speaking, ISVs create and sell software products that run on one or more IT platforms. ISVs might offer consulting services, but they typically aren’t consulting companies per se. Neither are they simply Value-Added Resellers (VARs) or Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), who embed or customize someone else’s products. Rather, ISVs sell their own intellectual property as installable, configurable software. The largest software vendors are responsible for the enterprise applications that we run, the operating systems we use, and the infrastructure platforms on top of which we conduct business — think IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, HP, and CA.

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Mashups and SOBAs: Which is the Tail and Which is the Dog?
New buzzwords are one of the many side-effects of emerging markets, and into our buzzword-heavy world comes yet another doozie — the mashup. According to Wikipedia, a mashup is a Web site or Web application that seamlessly combines content from more than one source into an integrated experience. Falling under the increasingly broad buzz-umbrella of Web 2.0, Mashups bear a more-than-passing resemblance to the Service-oriented composite applications ZapThink frequently speaks about — known in analyst-speak as Service-Oriented Business Applications, or SOBAs. In fact, the overlap of mashups and SOBAs, or enterprise mashups, has recently become a hot topic du jour in the blogosphere. The collision of two heretofore distinct areas of discussion within the blogosphere (in this case, mashups and Service-Oriented Architecture, or SOA) inevitably results a measure of consternation, because the people within each group bring a different context to the discussion. In this case, there is…

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