Service-Oriented Integration
Connecting systems both within the enterprise and with suppliers, partners, and customers is of critical importance to today’s enterprise. However, integration remains complex, expensive, and risky. While Web Services won’t be the magic bullet that immediately solves these problems, they enable a new approach to integration. Service-Oriented Integration (SOI) leverages open standards, loose coupling, and dynamic description and discovery capabilities of Web Services to reduce the complexity, cost, and risk of integration. This report identifies the key aspects of SOI, solutions for implementing SOI, ROI metrics, and critical challenges.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $1495[/hide]…

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XML in the Content Lifecycle
Key Findings: The market for XML content lifecycle solutions is expected to grow from $1.8 Billion in 2003 to over $11.6 Billion by 2008. Producers of content in the enterprise spend over 60% of their time locating, formatting, and structuring content and just 40% of their time actually creating it. By 2008, about 60% of all content lifecycle products will be XML-enabled. the primary challenge in the enterprise for producers of content — information that is intended for human consumption — is content reuse: the ability to integrate content from disparate sources. Efforts to improve content processes have been slowed by efforts to extract and manipulate content from multiple, disparate data sources. Table of Contents: I. Report Scope II. The Growth and Management of Content in the Enterprise 2.1. Sources and Growth of Content in the Enterprise 2.2. The Content Management Challenge 2.3. The Evolution of the…

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Overcoming XML’s Hidden Processing Costs
XML is pervasive. In a matter of years, it will fuel every application, device, and document found in enterprise networks. However, as XML proliferates, it will stress existing systems and enterprise budgets to their breaking points. This is because existing n-tier software architectures and legacy infrastructures were not designed to process this verbose new data type efficiently. What enterprises need is a new way to process XML in the network, rather than in software at the database, application server, or presentation tiers. Yet today’s existing network infrastructure is limited to switching lower layer protocols and is unable to detect XML – much less parse and process it. An emerging class of hardware-based XML-aware network devices addresses the performance, security and management issues that come with XML’s use in enterprise applications. These purpose-built network devices enable enterprises to process high volumes of XML in a way that offers high performance, optimal…

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XML in the Content Lifecycle
The process of creating content — information meant for human consumption — is almost always extremely effort-intensive. People must spend time organizing information prior to creation, constructing the content, and laying out the information so that it is easily read. With so much time, cost, and effort invested in content, it makes sense to reduce costs by reusing content as much as possible. Furthermore, content-oriented processes involve a complex set of interactions that progress in a “Content Lifecycle” consisting of five major stages: content creation, management, publishing, syndication, and protection. Each of these phases requires different technologies, processes, and resources. By rearchitecting content representation technologies to treat content as another asset in the corporate IT infrastructure, businesses can realize the benefits long promised to us by reusable and agile content. But first, we need to move from ad-hoc content creation to content componentization, and then to content services. XML and…

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ZapNote: Corel
In 2001, Corel began an aggressive campaign to add XML to their advanced publishing products line. They realized that XML could take content development and management to a new level. XML lets users create content that they can categorize, search, re-use, and format automatically. No one understood the power of XML better than SoftQuad, which Corel acquired in 2001. SoftQuad had long played an instrumental role in the development of document-centric technologies. Corel recently shared with ZapThink its strategy for tying together its SoftQuad, Ventura Publisher, and other product lines into a cohesive mix applicable for content developers and publishers alike. The results offer a compelling set of solutions for the corporate enterprise looking to adopt XML as a component of its content development and delivery.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $395[/hide]…

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Service-Oriented Integration
Key Findings: Service-Oriented Integration (SOI) simplifies system integration by providing a single, simple architectural framework based on Web Services in which to build, deploy, and manage application functionality. The SOI market is expected to grow from $435 million in 2001 to about $6.2 billion in 2006. The top three EAI vendors have over 43% of the overall EAI market. With the entrance of Microsoft and other vendors in 2002, this landscape is expected to change. Web Services isn’t an integration technology, but a distributed computing technology that lends itself well to being used in integration scenarios. In a Web Services context, there really is no difference between EAI, B2Bi, and Data Integration. SOI solutions allow users to get a greater level of interaction and granularity with components deep within the application. SOI faces challenges in immature specifications, insufficient reliability, security, and transaction control. Microsoft and IBM have made strong…

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ZapNote: Ipedo
Ipedo has developed a proprietary, hierarchical, in-memory database engine aimed at storing XML documents "natively". The Ipedo XML Database uses memory techniques to get substantial performance gains versus some other NXD approaches. Built as an all-Java server, the Ipedo system is meant to be easily integrated with typical application server environments. Ipedo has extended XPath for search across multiple XML documents and has also included XSLT transformations within the data store itself.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $395[/hide]…

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ZapNote: X-Hive
The most valuable attribute of Native XML Data Stores (NXDs) is their ability to store arbitrary and highly variant XML documents. XML-enabled RDBMS systems require explicit mappings to XML documents, and by their very nature are unable to deal with XML documents that have a highly variable structure and take advantage of XML’s extensibility capabilities. X-Hive provides a solution to this problem by presenting a highly scalable NXD system that is capable of supporting a large quantity and volume of XML documents. X-Hive/DB is differentiated itself by its focus on high volume XML data storage requirements, support for advanced XML query and storage specifications, and focused support of its European customer base.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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ZapNote: B-Bop
The only true solutions for enterprise-wide XML data storage and retrieval are XML-enabled RDBMS and Native XML Data Store (NXD) approaches. The challenge with XML-enabled RDBMS is that they are not very well suited to highly extensible and flexible documents, while the challenge with NXDs is that they are unproven technologies with very small user bases. However, there is another option that is a sort of "middle ground": the use of an interpretive middle layer over standard RDBMS systems that offers schema-independent, "native" XML data storage. In this vein, B-Bop offers their Xfinity Server as a way of providing the features of Native XML storage while utilizing existing relational storage architectures. B-BOP: XFINITY SERVER LEVERAGING RELATIONAL DATABASES FOR XML STORAGE…

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