SOA Implementation Best Practices
The role of SOA is to provide an architectural approach that supports an organization’s ability to support ongoing business change in the face of a heterogeneous environment. However, since SOA does not introduce a new programming language or runtime environment, organizations must implement code that underpins and exposes a Service interface somehow. Since implementation matters to computers as much as architecture matters to people, it makes sense to consider the runtime environment of the implementation to be a good place to coordinate Service interactions. When looking at the technology buying patterns in the world of SOA, there is one common thread. The influence of the larger SOA vendors is very much a force in the market today. Within this context, and given continued consolidation, confusion, and change in the SOA marketplace, organizations should make a careful evaluation of the various vendor offerings that support SOA implementations. The consolidation of…

Read More

Software AG Strengthens SOA Security with Layer 7 Partnership
“SOA governance presents a complex set of challenges, because it involves policy creation, communication, management, and enforcement across the Service lifecycle,” said Jason Bloomberg, Managing Partner at ZapThink. “The combination of CentraSite and Layer 7 Technologies’ SecureSpan security and policy enforcement capabilities provides enterprises with a comprehensive governance and security solution that covers the gamut from policy definition through enforcement.” Read more at: Business Wire…

Read More

Defining a Business Service
Pointers for how to define a business Service, including a discussion of Service granularity and the business Service abstraction. Presents a clear distinction among Service implementation, Service interface and abstracted Business Service. Presented at a Software AG Webinar on October 24, 2007. 16-slide PowerPoint in pdf format.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Subscribe Today to Get Access![/hide]…

Read More

Practical SOA for Financial Services Presentations
Presentations given at ZapThink’s Practical SOA for Financial Services event in London on September 27, 2007. Presenters and their presentations include: Jason Bloomberg, Managing Partner, ZapThink: Welcome & SOA Adoption Trends for Financial Services and the World Michael Poulin, Head of Business Analysis & Web Delivery, Fidelity Investment International: Case Study in SOA: The Next Steps in the Organically Growing SOA Jim Mackay, Chief Marketing Officer, iTKO: SOA Quality and the Financial Services Industry David Davies, VP Products, Corizon: Agility at the User Interface William Morgan, Lead Technical Architect for Financial Services in the UK, LogicaCMG: SOA Case Study: Homeserve GB – Composite applications for insurance customer care David Wright, Director, Global Financial Services, Software AG webMethods: Real Value from SOA and BPM: How Financial Institutions can transform their Businesses and Get There Faster Listen to the Podcast with previews of these presentations! This document is a…

Read More

alfabet: Applying Enterprise Architecture Management to SOA
ZapThink’s perspective on Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is that SOA is essentially a set of Enterprise Architecture (EA) best practices, linking the disciplines of SOA and EA together. As organizations make progress with their SOA initiatives, they generally come to agree with this perspective. As a consequence, one of the primary benefits of the “SOA as EA” perspective is the ability to leverage EA Management (EAM) tools for SOA initiatives. Most EAM tools, however, do not have capabilities specific to SOA. planningIT from alfabet is an important exception. In addition to a full breadth of collaborative EA modules that cover the gamut of IT planning activities, planningIT also offers some specific capabilities that help with the planning of SOA initiatives as well, including tools for planning reusable Services that meet the needs of the business.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

Read More

Justifying & Funding your SOA Project
Many organizations struggle to build the business case for implementing Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)–not because SOA doesn’t provide numerous benefits to the organization, but rather because they don’t properly identify the business problems in their organization that SOA would be particularly well suited to address. This paper addresses this deficiency by delineating the most important business benefits of SOA: reduction in the cost of integration, achieving asset reuse, increasing business visibility, and achieving business agility. Implementing SOA to achieve these benefits, however, requires many capabilities that fall under the broad umbrella of SOA governance, including visibility into IT assets, change management, enforcement of best practices, measurement of effectiveness, collaboration capabilities, lifecycle management, and open standards support.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

Read More

Software AG CentraSite Community
Written by Tony Baer, Associate Analyst, ZapThink. Governance is drawing significant attention from the boardroom down as a result of heightened regulation, increased competition, and constant change in the marketplace. There are two faces to SOA governance. On one hand, SOA governance simply means governing a SOA implementation initiative—for example, communicating corporate policies to developers implementing Services, and giving them the tools they need to follow those policies as they assemble the various elements of the SOA implementation. On the other hand, there’s a broader, more strategic definition of SOA governance: IT governance in the context of SOA. Software AG takes a big picture view to SOA governance, based on the premise that SOA governance extends well beyond the governing of Web Services. It believes that the extensible nature of SOA requires a similarly extensible strategy to governance. Software AG has established the CentraSite Community as its strategy…

Read More

SOA: Building the Roadmap
Written by ZapThink Associate Analyst Tony Baer. By now, most Information Technology (IT) organizations have become aware of the potential of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to pierce through those silos. Just as Rome wasn’t built in a day, implementing SOA should be an incremental, iterative process that should start modestly. Your first foray into a SOA implementation should be through a pilot project, where your organization has the opportunity to conduct an evaluation to determine whether to make further investments. The goal is gain experience while mitigating the risks. Consequently, the scope of the pilot should be limited. Choose a handful of Services that will make a difference, and that people will notice. Governance is essential. Lacking governance, SOA projects become yet another example of undisciplined software development. As your organization becomes more experienced with SOA, it eventually learns to compose business Services bridging those silos, and gradually becomes…

Read More

The Value of SOA Governance
The definition of corporate governance is creating, communicating, and enforcing policies in a corporate environment. Governance is the key to balancing executive control with employee and customer empowerment across the enterprise. While many corporate governance activities don’t directly involve the information technology (IT) department, the enterprise does call upon IT to provide tooling for automating policy creation and enforcement, when it’s possible to represent policies in a machine-understandable format. Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is an approach to organizing IT resources to meet the changing needs of the business in flexible ways. Governance is an essential part of any SOA implementation, because it ensures that the organization applies and enforces the policies that apply to the Services that the organization creates as part of its SOA initiative. But more importantly, organizations can leverage SOA best practices to represent policies broadly in such a way that the organization can achieve better policy…

Read More

BPM the SOA Way
Successful businesses are built on great products or services, operational efficiency, excellence in satisfying customers, well-honed sales and marketing efforts, and leveraging relationships with suppliers and partners. To respond to changing market forces that impact these efforts, companies don’t necessarily change the product or service itself, but rather the process they use to serve their customers. However, building an agile infrastructure that supports process needs from beginning to end and top to bottom while allowing for frequent and ad hoc changes presents many challenges to the business. Enterprise applications typically provide only a siloed approach to business process management (BPM) and are inflexible in the face of process change. To achieve true business agility, organizations must separate the processes from the underlying applications using an architectural approach that abstracts the application functionality as Services so that the business can compose those Services into composite applications in a flexible manner.

Read More