Presentations from ZapThink’s Fifth SOA Practitioner’s Forum in Geneva, Switzerland
In this ZIP file, you will find the collection of presentations from ZapThink’s Fifth SOA Practitioner’s Forum in Geneva, Switzerland. Presentations include: Fundamental SOA Concepts – Ronald Schmelzer, ZapThink [E] SOA, Business Process, and BPM – Jean-Paul de Vooght, CTP [E] Real implementation cases of SOA – Malhar Kamdar, BEA [F] The ESB as SOA Infrastructure: Controlling SOA at Runtime – Claus Thoden, BEA [E] Measuring SOA Maturity and the Platform – Xavier Fournier-Morel, SQLi [F] Enterprise Web 2.0 – David McFarlane, Nexaweb [E] How to move your Legacy Host to SOA – Ido Hardonag, NetManage [E] SOA Architectural Deep Dive – Ron Schmelzer, ZapThink [E] The download is about 11 Megabytes, and you need to provide your permission to share contact information with event sponsors to download this file.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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REST and Web Services: The ZapThink Take
Question: what do you call two or more architects in a room? Answer: an argument. Now that Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is the topic du jour within many such rooms in enterprises today, one favorite argument is over Representational State Transfer (REST) and its relationship to Web Services. Many such discussions degenerate into a religious discussion over which approach is better, but as with most arguments in the SOA space, the reality is far more subtle. Up until now, ZapThink has been happy to stay on the sidelines of this battle, but the time has come for us to weigh in with the ZapThink take on the REST vs. Web Services debate. The Context for REST and Web Services This perennial debate centers on a core challenge of SOA: what is the best way to create a loosely-coupled Service interface? One approach is the style of distributed computing known as…

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SOA for Independent Software Vendors (ISVs)
As Enterprise Architecture, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is particularly useful in large enterprises, and increasingly, to small and midsize businesses, as well. However, those are only one part of the IT ecosystem. What about those companies that are in the business of building and selling software products, so called independent software vendors (ISVs)? Generally speaking, ISVs create and sell software products that run on one or more IT platforms. ISVs might offer consulting services, but they typically aren’t consulting companies per se. Neither are they simply Value-Added Resellers (VARs) or Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), who embed or customize someone else’s products. Rather, ISVs sell their own intellectual property as installable, configurable software. The largest software vendors are responsible for the enterprise applications that we run, the operating systems we use, and the infrastructure platforms on top of which we conduct business — think IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, HP, and CA.

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Solving the Service Granularity Challenge
For us analysts that have been covering the markets around XML, Web Services, and Service Orientation it certainly is heartening to see that our audience of end users, vendors, and consulting firms are now asking some of the more complex and deeper questions around how to do architecture right. It seems that we’ve finally crossed the chasm and architects in particular now have a pretty good idea what SOA is and why they need it. Rather than trying to redefine what SOA is and what is means to the business, people are focusing on the more important issue of how to do SOA right. In that vein, some of our most recent conversations have centered on how to go about building the “right” Services. A key part of answering this question is making sure that we build Services at the right level of granularity. Granularity is a relative measure…

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Service Orient or Be Doomed: ZapThink Analysts Announce Publication of their Latest Book!
Ever wonder why businesses are unable to keep up with today’s pace of change? Name your business goal–productivity, profitability, efficiency; today, they all depend on Information Technology (IT). IT is more important to business today than it ever was. While IT in the past has helped companies increasingly make their businesses more productive and efficient, today’s IT is simply getting in the way of change. It is increasingly becoming clear that the way that businesses utilize IT is increasingly making them less agile, less responsive to change, and less able to capitalize on new opportunities. Something has to be done to stop the problem of IT becoming the bottleneck of business. SERVICE ORIENT OR BE DOOMED! How Service Orientation will Change Your Business (Wiley, February 24, 2006;$39.95 cloth) is the first book aimed at regular businesspeople that helps business become more agile by offering technological, process, and cultural changes…

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Enabling Products & Standards
Presentation on the current state of the SOA market. This presentation covers: The State of the Market Introducing the SOAIF Security, Management & SOAIF WS Security Market Map Key Security/Policy Vendors Key Security/Policy Standards WS Management Market Map Key SOA Management Vendors Lifecycle/Governance/Metadata Key Management/Lifecycle Standards Arch., Devt. Tools & SOAIF SOA Tools Market Map App. Integration, Process & SOAIF SOP Market Map SO Integration/Process Key Vendors SO Integration/Process Standards The “Enterprise Service Bus” Lack of Convergence on ESB Meaning State of ESB Market Composite Application Key Vendors CurrentStateSOAPractice-Europe-022006-ZTP-0212-1…

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Right-Sizing Services
We all know the tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears: the story of an interloper that seemed to want her chair, porridge, and bed just so, despite her invasion of ursine privacy. Just as one-size-fits-all food or accommodations could not sate Goldilocks, so too are early proponents of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) realizing that they must size their Services just so in order to meet their pressing business problems so that they can maximize reuse and minimize unnecessary expense. Not only that, these early adopters are realizing that they must tackle significant aspects of Service infrastructure and architectural best practices from the very beginning, even if they are deploying a small set of Services. After all, a successful SOA implementation requires not only the right Services, but implementing them in the right way. One of ZapThink’s repeated refrains is that SOA is an aspect of enterprise architecture, which itself…

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ZapThink’s Service-Oriented Architecture Roadmap
ZAPTHINK’S ROADMAP TO SOA ADOPTION Companies today are struggling with the best way to implement IT infrastructures that enable business agility. Service-oriented architectures based on Web Services provide cost-effective approaches to achieving companies’ agility goals. ZapThink’s Roadmap to SOA adoption is a one-of-a-kind, full-color 24×18″ poster that provides organizations of all sizes and types an at-a-glance view at how to approach implementing Service-oriented architectures in a way that provides return-on-investment (ROI) at each step along the path toward agile IT infrastructures. Included on this easy-to-read poster are the steps and phases by which companies can move from today’s brittle infrastructures to loosely-coupled, coarse-grained, asynchronous SOAs. The poster covers concepts in point-to-point Web Services implementations for integration, securing, managing, and adding process layers to these services, implementing registries and management for loose coupling, moving to asynchronous invocations for greater reliability, and concepts in virtualization, contract-first development, SOA governance,…

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Creating Contract and Policy Metadata
One of the first questions that archtiects and developers are posed with when building an SOA is exactly how to build a “Service”. Companies building loosely-coupled Services know that contracts and policies, built in metadata, are key to making SOA work. So, what exactly goes into Service contracts and policies, and what specifications are currently available to meet Service contract needs? This 24 slide presentation outlines some of the key issues in creating and implementing Service contracts as well as the steps companies should take to create them. HowBuildService-082005-ZTP-0184-1…

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What Belongs in a Service Contract?
Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) has finally turned a corner: companies are shifting from the tentative first steps of Service enabling a few systems here and there to strategic SOA rollouts of all sizes that now have the blessing of senior management in the IT departments, and sometimes business executives themselves. In the hundreds of conversations that ZapThink has had in the past year, we have recognized a clear, decisive pattern of organizations moving toward SOA and away from the tightly-coupled, brittle integration approaches of yesterday. We’re no longer getting questions about the “whats” or “whys” of SOA, but rather the “hows” and “whens.” In fact, companies no longer discuss whether or not to embark on an SOA initiative. The eventual move to SOA is fast becoming a fait accompli. In the midst of this decisive move toward SOA, we are now starting to get more difficult, tactical questions about how to…

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