The SOA Talent Squeeze
As 2004 winds down, the Service Orientation (SO) winds are shifting. SO software and hardware vendors’ markets are consolidating, as surviving players mature their products and build traction among customers who increasingly understand the value of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to their organizations. While IT end-users focused their attention on Web Services and SOA products and the vendors who offered them up to this point in time, their attention is now moving to professional services organizations (PSOs) as these consulting firms ramp up their SOA practices. This shift in activity marks an important step in the maturation of SO adoption within enterprises: ZapThink has seen that while most of the Fortune 500 was dabbling with SOA in 2004, 2005 is the year that many will ramp up their SOA initiatives, in many cases to cross-departmental and cross-organizational projects, and in some instances to enterprise-wide implementations. Even enterprises with large IT shops…

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First Steps to Building a Single View of an SOA
This presentation was presented for the Software AG webinar and explained the key steps needed to realizing and implementing an SOA. Topics covered: Big picture methodology The SOA implementation Road Map How the ESB fits in Where semantic integration fits in Common pit-falls Cultural issues Things to look for in a vendor Common misconceptions[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Will Binary XML Solve XML Performance Woes?
XML’s blatant inefficiency is one oft-cited downside to anything XML-based, including Web Services. Text-based, metadata-laden XML is intended both for machine processing and human readability, resulting in message sizes that can easily be 10 to 50 times larger than equivalent messages sent via binary encodings. To make matters worse, conducting a simple point-to-point exchange between XML conversant endpoints might require each of the following operations: decryption, validation, parsing, marshalling, serialization, canonicalization, document signing, and encryption. Each of these steps must be executed on a per-message basis, and as such can impose a significant load on processing machines. To make matters worse, XML traffic is content-oriented, rather than protocol-oriented. As a result, devices responsible for performing any operation on XML traffic must make decisions based upon the content of the messages, rather than the protocols that underlie those messages. All of these operations impact XML processing performance, threatening to grind such…

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ZapThink: XML Inefficiency Choking Networks
Market for High Performance and Appliance Approaches for XML to reach $1.2 Billion by 2010 WALTHAM, MA, November 16, 2004 — The rapid adoption of XML and Web Services has a significant downside. As network traffic based on XML increases, IT data center administrators and developers are quickly realizing that the operational inefficiencies of XML are bogging down their general-purpose hardware and software, according to ZapThink’s latest report, “High Performance and Appliance Approaches for XML.” Increased requirements for advanced security, reliability, and scalability can put an overwhelming burden on existing network infrastructure that is already stretched to the limit handling basic XML processing tasks. As a result, customers are increasingly demanding a new class of appliance and optimized software solutions to handle their XML processing needs. “Network traffic increases due to the increasing quantity and size of messages, both XML and non-XML based, will tax existing corporate IT…

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SOA Governance: Reengineering IT Governance
In today’s tough business climate of heightened competition, complex regulations, and constant change, management must be able to set guidelines for their company, and then have sufficient visibility and control to ensure that people are following those guidelines. Information technology (IT) is at once the most important asset for providing this visibility and control to executive management, while at the same time impedes the very visibility and control IT promises to provide through the complexity, opacity, and inflexibility of the typical enterprise IT environment. It’s no wonder, then, that IT governance is the most critical area of corporate governance in today’s competitive enterprise — both the governance of IT and the use of IT for corporatewide governance. However, how can executives rely upon brittle legacy IT infrastructures connected with spaghetti integration to offer the governance they require? The answer lies in architecture, because architecture provides the framework for the…

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