SOA Consulting: Current Market Trends
Market Overview Few enterprises are buying SOA by name. Instead, business buyers are paying for solutions to business problems, and more consulting firms than ever before are leveraging Service Orientation best practices to provide those solutions. The main buyer of such initiatives has shifted toward the non-technical, business part of the enterprise. The clear pattern with today‚Äôs SOA projects is that they are increasingly business-focused. Many consulting firms integrate SOA best practices into a broad differentiated offering that is not necessarily specific to SOA. Many ostensible SOA efforts are little more than middleware shell games. Product vendors often distort the true message of SOA to best fit their product offerings. Similarly, the core mistake that some consulting firms are making is in confusing architecture with implementation. Future Trends ZapThink expects the percentage of IT projects overall that leverage Service Orientation best practices to continue to grow over time, and those…

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SOA for Independent Software Vendors (ISVs)
As Enterprise Architecture, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is particularly useful in large enterprises, and increasingly, to small and midsize businesses, as well. However, those are only one part of the IT ecosystem. What about those companies that are in the business of building and selling software products, so called independent software vendors (ISVs)? Generally speaking, ISVs create and sell software products that run on one or more IT platforms. ISVs might offer consulting services, but they typically aren’t consulting companies per se. Neither are they simply Value-Added Resellers (VARs) or Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), who embed or customize someone else’s products. Rather, ISVs sell their own intellectual property as installable, configurable software. The largest software vendors are responsible for the enterprise applications that we run, the operating systems we use, and the infrastructure platforms on top of which we conduct business — think IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, HP, and CA.

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The Path to SOA for ISVs
This presentation covers the challenges that independent software vendors (ISVs) face when they look to leverage SOA in their products. The presentation discusses the steps ISVs can take to Service-enable their products, and provides illustrations of key vendors who have done so.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Subscribe Today to Get Access![/hide]…

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Accenture: SOA as Strategic Architecture for Improving Business Performance
Professional services firm Accenture’s core mission is to improve the business performance of its clients. Accenture accomplishes this mission through a combination of business process expertise and technical consulting. Accenture’s technology roadmap offers their clients an approach to building information technology solutions and approaches that will meet the goal of business performance improvement. Accenture believes that Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) will underpin this technology roadmap. They believe SOA will be the single dominant technical architecture in the future, driven primarily by the need for interoperability. As a result, they are recommending and implementing SOA-based approaches for improving the business of clients worldwide.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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ZapThink: Client-side Web Technologies Inadequate to Meet Evolving Needs of Web Services
ZapThink: Client-side Web Technologies Inadequate to Meet Evolving Needs of Web Services New Class of Rich and Smart Clients Evolving to Solve Next-Generation Computing Needs WALTHAM, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–March 3, 2004–The Internet and Web have provided immense scalability and manageability benefits to computer users for a decade now, but at a price – poor support for rich interactivity. Now, companies are increasingly demanding a rich set user experience capabilities that include visual interactivity elements and instant access to information, interaction with distributed and remote applications, and integration with local desktop applications. ZapThink concludes in its report entitled “Rich and Smart Clients for Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs)” that today’s Web technologies are wholly inadequate to meet the needs of emerging standards-based, loosely coupled, distributed applications. “Simply put, today’s corporate portals must move beyond Web-based thin client technologies,” said Ronald Schmelzer, senior analyst with ZapThink. “Rather, companies must leverage the…

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Rich and Smart Clients for Service-Oriented Architectures
Key Points: Rich clients will supplant portals as the primary interface to Web Services and Service-oriented functionality in the enterprise by the end of 2007. The total opportunity for rich clients for SOAs is over $923 million by 2010 realized by new entrant and incumbent vendors. The window of opportunity for new rich client entrants will start to wane when Microsoft makes the Longhorn wave of OS improvements generally available in 2006, at the earliest The increasing adoption of devices, mobile computing, and sometimes-connected systems, movement to asynchronous computing, and adoption of e-Forms will mandate widespread and rapid adoption of rich clients. Table of Contents: I. Report Scope 4 II. The Evolution of the Presentation Layer 5 2.1. The Need for the Rich Client 6 2.2. Why the Portal is Not Enough 8 2.3. Will Applications Deliver their own UI in the future? 9 2.4. Understanding the Presentation Layer Requirements…

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Service-Oriented Process
Key Findings: Service-Oriented Process is Key to Meeting Business Agility Requirements Service-oriented process includes orchestration, choreography, composition, workflow, transactions, and collaboration of Web Services. The market for Service-Oriented Process solutions will grow from $120 Million in 2003 to over $8.3 Billion by 2008. The standards landscape will converge on a single choreography, orchestration, and process flow specification in the next 12-18 months. By 2005, over 70% of Web Services implementations will be process-driven. Services must be developed devoid of process in order that they can participate in an SOA that meets the goals of business agility Service-Oriented Management techniques can assist in managing discrete services as well as end-to-end business processes. Table of Contents: I. Report Scope II. The Context for Service-Oriented Process 2.1. What are Business Processes? 2.2. Why is Process Important to the Enterprise? 2.3. Connecting Business Requirements to IT Capabilities Through Process 2.4. Organizational Roles and Business…

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