Optimizing Web Services in the Enterprise
XML and Web Services traffic is consuming an increasing percentage of the bandwidth on the corporate network. At the same time, enterprise IT architects and data center administrators are struggling with how to deploy XML and Web Services-based solutions in the enterprise in a reliable, secure, and manageable manner. Furthermore, existing computing infrastructures are increasingly inadequate to meet the demands of high-performance XML and Web Services capabilities. To solve many of these challenges, vendors are introducing a new category of intelligent network device that are able to intercept, inspect, transform, and redirect XML and Web Services requests according to business policies. As enterprises move from simple, point-to-point applications of Web Services to building Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs) that leverage the capabilities of XML and Web Services, end-users must understand how to optimize not only their current XML-based integration solutions, but also the performance of their SOA implementations as they build out…

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Building Security into a Service-Oriented Architecture
Service-oriented architectures (SOAs) based upon Web Services are an evolutionary improvement upon existing IT architectures, primarily because these SOAs offer loose coupling between Service producers and consumers. Loose coupling refers to a level of independence between the participants in a Web Services interaction that allows them to interact on their own terms, without requiring substantial changes on one system when the other changes. Such loose coupling enables an enterprise’s IT infrastructure to be agile in the face of change. Loose coupling, however, while simple to understand, is complex to implement. There are many requirements facing an enterprise’s IT infrastructure that threaten the loose coupling of its architecture, and the most significant of these is security. Because fundamental security principles require a Service to authenticate a consumer, the Service and its consumer run the risk of being tightly coupled, unless the security itself can be handled in a loosely coupled fashion.

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Service-Oriented Process
Key Findings: Service-Oriented Process is Key to Meeting Business Agility Requirements Service-oriented process includes orchestration, choreography, composition, workflow, transactions, and collaboration of Web Services. The market for Service-Oriented Process solutions will grow from $120 Million in 2003 to over $8.3 Billion by 2008. The standards landscape will converge on a single choreography, orchestration, and process flow specification in the next 12-18 months. By 2005, over 70% of Web Services implementations will be process-driven. Services must be developed devoid of process in order that they can participate in an SOA that meets the goals of business agility Service-Oriented Management techniques can assist in managing discrete services as well as end-to-end business processes. Table of Contents: I. Report Scope II. The Context for Service-Oriented Process 2.1. What are Business Processes? 2.2. Why is Process Important to the Enterprise? 2.3. Connecting Business Requirements to IT Capabilities Through Process 2.4. Organizational Roles and Business…

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ZapNote: HandySoft
As systems become increasingly more integrated and heterogeneous, the need for a robust workflow approach is becoming steadily more apparent. The new class of "enterprise workflow solutions" or more increasingly known as Business Process Management (BPM) solutions have coalesced around an set of functionality and performance requirements that meet the needs of an extended enterprise that includes an organization’s partners, customers, and suppliers. HandySoft aims to simplify and enable complex intersystem workflow and business process automation through its BizFlow product, which provides a comprehensive set of XML-enabled collaborative tools driven by a powerful process management engine.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Open is a Four-Letter Word
The past three years have certainly been boom years for the IT industry. Not from an economic perspective, but rather in the growth of the number and variety of standards that have been proposed. One of the key properties of Web Services and the Service-oriented architectures built upon them is the fact that they are based upon open standards. After all, standards are an essential element of the maturation of any technology. In the case of distributed computing, open standards promise to increase interoperability, reduce TCO, widen the base of skilled developers, and increase vendor choice. With so much riding on the power of open standards, you would think that there would be broad agreement as to just what “open” and “standard” mean. Unfortunately, there is still plenty of confusion about the meanings of these two terms. What exactly is a standard? A standard is simply…

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Solving the IT Impasse with Service Orientation
There’s been a lot of talk about Web Services and Service-oriented architectures, but today’s IT managers aren’t looking for talk — they’re looking for practical solutions to today’s tough IT problems that are effective, yet inexpensive to implement. Fortunately, companies can use Web Services today to reduce the cost of integration substantially, and used strategically, Service-oriented architectures can reduce the complexity, inflexibility, and brittleness that plagues so many IT organizations. Such architectures, however, take time and effort to put in place — time that many organizations may feel they can’t afford to spend. As a result, companies should take a step-by-step approach to implementing architectural change in their IT organizations. Fortunately, regardless of whether the existing architecture is n-tier, client/server or even centralized mainframe, these organizations have the ability to build SOAs by providing a working layer of abstraction on top of their existing architecture, as long as they have…

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