SOA Governance
In today’s tough business climate of heightened competition, complex regulations, and constant change, the issue of corporate governance has risen to the top of many executives’ minds. Management must be able to set the groundrules that everybody within their company has to follow, they must require the visibility needed to confirm that people are following the rules, and they must have the control necessary to make the appropriate adjustments. No area of an enterprise’s operations are as complex as information technology (IT). Combine this complexity with the typical IT shop’s inflexibility and opacity, and it’s no wonder that IT governance is the most critical area of corporate governance in today’s competitive enterprise. Of all the different elements and processes that make up IT governance, the ones that focus on enterprise architecture are the most important, because architecture provides the framework for the IT infrastructure and its use within the…

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Samsung SDS: Leading the Pack for Web Services Implementation in the Far East
Samsung SDS is the IT services arm of the Korea-based Samsung Group, one of the largest conglomerates in the Asia/Pacific Rim region. In 2002, Samsung SDS implemented a strategy to become the regional leader in Web Services and Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) implementations, in spite of the fact that their customer base was largely unready for these emerging technologies. To this end, Samsung SDS built a core team focused on emerging Web Services and SOA technologies Web Services team with the necessary expertise to implement large-scale Web Services implementations, as well as architectural expertise. To date, Samsung SDS has implemented a number of successful Web Services projects, most of which are for sister companies within the Samsung Group–a strategy for building expertise and reference projects that has worked well for them in the past.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $495[/hide]…

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Infosys: Global Consulting Powerhouse
Infosys is a global IT services powerhouse that is transforming the world of professional services, systems integration, and global outsourced IT development and management. Their growth has been unimpeded, even through the difficult post dot-com boom years, mainly due to their innovative Global Delivery Model (GDM) approach. Web Services and SOA factor into their growth story by providing the technical underpinnings for achieving even greater amounts of efficiency and business value for their customers. This ZapNote explores Infosys’s overall business and one of the implementation frameworks they have developed to bootstrap Web Services implementations by providing an infrastructure for implementing SOA. [hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Putting The Control Of The Business Process Into The Business User’s Hands
In business, the only constant is change. Businesses, like people, are continuously evolving and as such face rapid and continual change. As markets and customer needs evolve, enterprises must respond with new ways to attract and retain customers and partners, increase operational efficiency, and achieve greater visibility into their business processes. In most businesses, however, business people control the processes, while IT people control the systems. IT staff see business processes through the lens of the low-level parts of the flow, rather than at the business level. As a result, they aren’t capable of implementing the processes so that they will meet continuously changing business requirements, thus impeding business agility. Business users are increasingly demanding that they have control over their own business processes — and so, are requiring systems that put control of the flow and logic into their hands, not those of IT. Fiorano Software offers…

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Outsourcing, SOA, and the Industrialization of IT
Long-time ZapThink readers know that we favor tying technology concepts to business issues. After all, the greatest benefit of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is the business value it offers via increased business agility. Our readers might expect, then, that when we get around to the high-profile business topic of outsourcing, we will build the argument that SOA helps companies outsource, because SOA provides an abstraction layer on top of existing technology resources, allowing third parties to provide those resources more easily, with business users ideally being none the wiser. Well, that argument is part of the story, but in this ZapFlash, we’re going one big step further. SOA and outsourcing are actually both key aspects of the movement of IT towards an industrialized model. Industrialization embodies a number of major concepts: the mechanization of production so that the mass assembly of components provide significant improvements in efficiency and cost, the…

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SAIC – SOA Case Study: The Navy/Marine Corps Intranet
Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) is a well-known, established, and respected systems integrator and professional services firm that services many of the largest corporations and government agencies. With over $6 Billion in revenue, the company is now looking to Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to help further their integration practice around legacy enablement, application consolidation, and improving the economics of IT for their customers. In this ZapNote, Zapthink analyzes an SOA approach that SAIC is adopting for proposed use in migrating thousands of applications made apparent by ongoing implementation of the Navy Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI). The NMCI project is of a significant magnitude, and represents new territory for architectural approaches such as SOA. It is clear that if SAIC can satisfy NMCI’s need for legacy migration, then SOA is a viable approach for complex environments such as these.

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Who is the SOA Buyer?
A well-known saying goes that the road to business success is littered with failed companies that had great technology. After all, a good product or technology concept alone is not sufficient to guarantee success in the market. Good companies also need effective sales and marketing to bring a well-understood product to the market. However, companies in emerging markets such as those for Web Services and Service-oriented architecture (SOA) products often forge ahead with their product development and sales plans without answering the critical question: “Who is the buyer of my product, and what problem of theirs does my product solve?” The answer to this question can often be surprisingly challenging for companies who are looking to sell their Web Services and SOA wares, since the broad, enterprise nature of SOA initiatives can make it quite unclear who the buyer is. SOA: Everybody’s Business Because SOA is an architectural…

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Software's Dirty Little Secret
Since the days of Bletchley Park‘s Colossus, the world’s first programmable computer, the creation of software has been separate from the production of the machines that run that software. For the first time, a machine was programmable instead of purpose-built. In other words, people did not determine the specific requirements for computers before they built them. Instead, programmers wrote software later to meet those requirements. No longer did hardware have purpose-built requirements; instead, people had the meta-requirement of programmability — the requirement that they be flexible enough to meet as-yet undefined requirements at some point in the future. Today, we use the term high technology to refer in part to programmable machines — whether they be computers or any number of other devices with the computer chips that enable them to meet the meta-requirement of programmability. While computers are high tech, the surprising fact is that software…

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