StrikeIron: Enabling the Service Economy
Companies are starting to discover the benefits of loosely coupled, composable, reusable Services —the ability to dramatically reduce the cost of integration, increase agility, and enable the governance of distributed systems. However, as they seek to build reusable Services, they face the challenge of quickly locating, understanding, and utilizing existing Services. Furthermore, third-party firms have already developed many of the Services that businesses need for their day-to-day operations, and those Services may be accessible on a pay-as-you-go basis. This increasing desire to build and exchange Services for mutual business benefit inspired StrikeIron to build a Service marketplace where Service providers can expose Services for consumption by third-parties and consumers can search, pay for, and reliably transact with those Services — in essence, an economy for reusable Services.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Finding the SOA Champion
From the business perspective, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) projects are fundamentally different from most other information technology (IT) projects in one significant way. Since one of the fundamental goals of SOA is to build reusable Services that consumers across the organization (and beyond) can access, it often doesn’t make sense for a single department or line of business to drive SOA projects on their own, without involvement from any other group in the organization. In the early pilot phases of an SOA rollout, departments might successfully tackle SOA implementations, since limited SOA projects are generally more prone to success than cross-departmental or enterprisewide initiatives. However, the issue of fragmented SOA initiatives predictably rears its ugly head as discussions about reusing Services across departments begin in earnest. Reusable Services sound good on paper, of course — there’s no questioning the cost savings and agility benefits from streamlining redundant, inefficient applications across…

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Services: Build, Buy, or Repurpose?
Smart companies approach all IT investment decisions with a three-part question: should they buy, build, or repurpose their IT resources to meet their emerging business needs? Such fundamental investment questions apply to all aspects of IT, ranging from network devices to application software to professional services needs. As a result, the same thought processes apply to burgeoning implementations of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA). However, one of the significant shifts in thinking that SOA introduces is the notion that business logic is not engrained in programming code, but rather in the declarative metadata that describes a Service and how it interacts with other Services. In essence, SOA advocates a movement away from code-centric development to configuration-centric composition. This shift to metadata-driven development introduces new challenges to how organizations purchase, repurpose, or develop Services. Rather than dealing with traditional development lifecycles, companies must now understand how to continually iterate the development of…

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Industry Luminaries to Debate Implementation for Service-Oriented Architecture on Live Webcast
WALTHAM, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–April 25, 2005–Companies are grappling with the best way to implement the rapidly growing Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach to distributed computing, including Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), SOA Fabric, and other means to implement SOA. To address these issues, ZapThink is hosting the industry’s key luminaries on this topic – Gordon Van Huizen from Sonic Software and Frank Martinez from Blue Titan – on its May 4, 2005 ZapForum Webcast entitled “The Great Debate: ESBs, Fabrics, or Something else?” “There’s way too much inconsistency in how companies are defining and tackling the various methods for implementing SOA,” said Ronald Schmelzer, senior analyst with ZapThink, LLC. “We hope to settle some of the issues around ESBs, SOA Fabrics, and other modes of implementing SOA once and for all on our May ZapForum Webcast.” Run like a call-in radio talk show, the ZapForum Webcast starts with thought-provoking content lead…

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MW2 Consulting: Combining an SOA Methodology & Blueprint for Successful SOA Implementations
MW2 Consulting is a midsize professional services firm focused on offering Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) solutions. Unlike many such firms, however, MW2 leverages key Service Orientation best practices within their organization to deliver faster, lower risk, more successful SOA implementations than traditional engagement approaches can provide. Specifically, their agile, model-driven engagement methodology combined with their comprehensive SOA Blueprint enable MW2 Consulting to leverage Service-Oriented approaches to deliver successful SOA implementations to their clients.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Reducing IT Costs & Improving Business Agility with SOA
ZapThink implementation roadmap presentation for Online Business Systems.. Designed for both business and IT professionals, this interactive forum will help you understand how to: Leverage and integrate your existing systems to do more. Align your business and IT departments more effectively. Automate and streamline your business processes with technology. [hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Subscribe Today to Get Access![/hide]…

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SOA Case Studies
Breakout presentation detailing case studies for Aeroplan, Merrill Lynch, E2Open, and The Hartford for Online Business Systems. Designed for both business and IT professionals, this interactive forum will help you understand how to: Leverage and integrate your existing systems to do more. Align your business and IT departments more effectively. Automate and streamline your business processes with technology. [hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Subscribe Today to Get Access![/hide]…

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Funding SOA
Most entrepreneurs and salespeople know that in order to make a sale, a deal needs three key ingredients: need, urgency, and budget. It’s hard to sell anything if the prospect doesn’t have a need for it, and it’s likewise hard to encourage a short-term purchase if there’s little urgency to implement the solution today versus a few years from now. Most importantly, it’s impossible to sell any sort of solution if there simply isn’t any budget to make the purchase happen — even if the prospect needs the solution urgently. Given that ZapThink spends much of our time discussing the need and urgency for implementing SOA projects, we’d be negligent if we didn’t discuss the third key ingredient to making SOA happen — funding. Simply put, where is the money going to come from to pay for SOA projects? The first challenge that any architectural initiative faces is that architecture…

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Adea Solutions: Rigorous Project Methodology for Lowering the Risk of SOA Engagements
Adea Solutions is an IT solutions and services company with over 1,700 team members in six countries. They leverage technology to create business value for clients in the communications, retail/consumer, healthcare/life sciences, and government industries. They offer an adaptable global delivery model and a rigorous SOA project methodology that lowers the risks of SOA projects, focusing on process decomposition, Service domain composition, and Service prioritization. Adea-032005-ZTZN-1173-1…

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Levi, Ray, & Shoup Inc.: Rewriting Business Applications in a Service-Oriented Fashion
Founded in 1979, Levi, Ray, & Shoup (LRS) originally focused on Enterprise Output Management (EOM) solutions that take output from MVS mainframes and route it to network attached printers. The company quickly expanded to produce solutions for state and local pension funds. Given the long history of the company’s offerings, the product has gone through a few revisions, first coded for mainframe operation, and later modified it for client/server, desktop OS, and then Web-based operation. However, all this modification resulted in code that was frequently customized and “forked” for the benefit of individual customer requirements, resulting in overly-complex application logic, expensive customization, and inability to repurpose the application for new interfaces or other purposes. As such, the company decided in 2004 to take the bold and courageous move to completely rewrite their business application from scratch in a Service-oriented fashion. With SOA, LRS now has a way to truly configure…

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