XML in the Content Lifecycle
Key Findings: The market for XML content lifecycle solutions is expected to grow from $1.8 Billion in 2003 to over $11.6 Billion by 2008. Producers of content in the enterprise spend over 60% of their time locating, formatting, and structuring content and just 40% of their time actually creating it. By 2008, about 60% of all content lifecycle products will be XML-enabled. the primary challenge in the enterprise for producers of content — information that is intended for human consumption — is content reuse: the ability to integrate content from disparate sources. Efforts to improve content processes have been slowed by efforts to extract and manipulate content from multiple, disparate data sources. Table of Contents: I. Report Scope II. The Growth and Management of Content in the Enterprise 2.1. Sources and Growth of Content in the Enterprise 2.2. The Content Management Challenge 2.3. The Evolution of the…

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Content as Services
Content is information that is intended for human consumption, as opposed to “data,” which are information intended for machine or system use. At times, we use other words such as knowledge, semantics, and intellectual assets to describe content. What differentiates human-oriented content from machine-oriented data is that people must create, manage, publish, and distribute content so that it can be represented in a variety of different ways, all the while maintaining the same overall meaning. Content represents information such as news, facts, fiction, charts, illustrations, photos, opinions — anything that communicates something to someone. Of course, information without structure is meaningless; a random assortment of facts doesn’t do anyone any good. Information must be organized and structured in a way that makes sense. This need for organizing and managing the creation and flow of content represents the core of all organizations’ content-based processes. Even though the…

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ZapNote: Xyleme
We often come to think of information as being either structured data stored in databases or unstructured documents stored on file systems or in full-text search engines. However, the reality is that information is represented in a wide spectrum of structures. XML is helping to bridge the worlds of structured and unstructured content by providing a unified means to represent information regardless of its structure. Since XML is inherently hierarchical and relies on tags to incorporate structure and meaning, the technologies for XML-based information retrieval and management are different from both database technologies and unstructured text technologies. Xyleme realizes that the value of an XML Data Store is not in simply a better store for XML data, but in the application of that data to store information that is neither completely structured nor completely unstructured — or in other words, to content.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to…

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Expanding The Potential of Filemaker With XML
The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is everywhere. It provides a standardized, versatile, and cross-platform way of describing and structuring data. With nearly 8.5 million units shipped worldwide, FileMaker is the leading workgroup database software for quickly creating and sharing business solutions. XML further extends the reach of FileMaker Pro 6. With the XML support in FileMaker Pro 6, developers and power users can create solutions that connect workgroups and other users with a virtually limitless number of other applications. Building upon earlier support of XML, the new FileMaker Pro 6 has integrated XML import/export in the application, to become even better connected to enterprise applications, systems, and business processes.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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Overcoming XML’s Hidden Processing Costs
XML is pervasive. In a matter of years, it will fuel every application, device, and document found in enterprise networks. However, as XML proliferates, it will stress existing systems and enterprise budgets to their breaking points. This is because existing n-tier software architectures and legacy infrastructures were not designed to process this verbose new data type efficiently. What enterprises need is a new way to process XML in the network, rather than in software at the database, application server, or presentation tiers. Yet today’s existing network infrastructure is limited to switching lower layer protocols and is unable to detect XML – much less parse and process it. An emerging class of hardware-based XML-aware network devices addresses the performance, security and management issues that come with XML’s use in enterprise applications. These purpose-built network devices enable enterprises to process high volumes of XML in a way that offers high performance, optimal…

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XML in the Content Lifecycle
The process of creating content — information meant for human consumption — is almost always extremely effort-intensive. People must spend time organizing information prior to creation, constructing the content, and laying out the information so that it is easily read. With so much time, cost, and effort invested in content, it makes sense to reduce costs by reusing content as much as possible. Furthermore, content-oriented processes involve a complex set of interactions that progress in a “Content Lifecycle” consisting of five major stages: content creation, management, publishing, syndication, and protection. Each of these phases requires different technologies, processes, and resources. By rearchitecting content representation technologies to treat content as another asset in the corporate IT infrastructure, businesses can realize the benefits long promised to us by reusable and agile content. But first, we need to move from ad-hoc content creation to content componentization, and then to content services. XML and…

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ZapNote: Epistemic
Traditional business intelligence (BI) solutions are often inflexible and incomplete, because they depend on rigidly structured data found in relational database systems (RDBMS). Such solutions often exclude nonrelational data, and force users into a "SQL query" mindset. Epistemic leverages the power of Web Services to break free from the traditional relational database/SQL query approach to business intelligence that poorly addresses non-relational data and provides intelligence of limited use. Where business analysts using these traditional tools must massage the results in Excel in order to analyze them, analysts using the Epicentric Analytics Toolkit can begin their analysis right away. Epistemic’s use of Web Services provides two important lessons for other software vendors: first, Web Services can provide substantial value to vendors who do not consider themselves "Web Services vendors," and second, Web Services offer much more than simple point-to-point integration.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $395[/hide]…

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