Securing & Managing XML & Web Services in the Enterprise
There are two related forces that are transforming information technology today: the rapid growth of XML traffic on the network, and the widespread adoption of Web Services as a way of reducing the cost of integration and moving traditional enterprise architectures to flexible, Service-oriented architectures. Enterprises must plan ahead if they want to be able to manage the XML and Web Services on their networks. Even more importantly, enterprises must take care to provide uninterrupted security for their IT environments. In the face of these changes, XML and Web Services introduce new security concerns for the IT manager, and new technology tools, including XML firewalls, offer the missing pieces of security that today’s enterprises need.[hide -1]Download File[/hide][hide +0]Register to Access this Document[/hide]…

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XML Proxies
As the use and proliferation of XML and Web Services spreads throughout the corporate IT environment, so too will the demands on optimizing the performance of the XML data and applying enterprise-wide XML policies. Increasingly organizations are seeking to find solutions that can transparently monitor XML traffic on the network and apply business rules or corporate IT policies such as security, routing, performance, management, transformation, or end-point connection provisioning. Enterprises will implement XML Proxies, which can be either hardware Network Appliances,software Proxies, or software Firewalls, as a transparent layer over current LAN and WAN traffic, monitoring and acting on XML data as dictated by pre-configured rules.

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XML Proxies
Key Findings: XML Proxies are hardware or software solutions that actively listen for XML traffic on the network and either pass it along unmodified or perform some action on the XML content. XML Proxies can operate transparently as an XML “gateway” or as auxiliary applications on the network. ZapThink estimates that XML represents less than 2% of all traffic on the enterprise network in 2002; however, this percentage is expected to increase to almost 25% of all LAN network traffic by 2006. Current firewall and proxy solutions are inadequate to handle XML traffic. Instead of being simply network protocol-aware, XML Proxies are XML-aware. XML Proxies are capable of examining traffic at the content level, and can optionally handle other message types such as HTML or EDI. XML Proxies will converge on a single set of functionality for handling corporate-wide XML security, management, routing, transformation, and performance enhancement. As XML Proxy…

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XML and Web Services Security
Key Findings: The next roadblock on the path to Web Services adoption is security. Security is today’s key enabler for Web Services. The XML and Web Services security market will reach $4.4 billion in 2006, which will represent 65% of the total authentication, authorization, and administration security market. This growth represents an average compound annual growth rate of 300%. Web Services offer great potential for B2B communication and integration, but the lack of robust security and manageability solutions currently inhibit the ability for companies to conduct business with each other via Web Services over the Internet. The combination of adequate funding, solid business models, seasoned management teams, and high quality engineering staff leads some startups to offer surprisingly robust XML and Web Services security solutions. The best positioned companies to be profitable in the XML and Web Services security space are those companies that already have deep technical knowledge…

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XML Security Technology Landscape
Key Findings: The next roadblock on the path to Web Services adoption is security. Security is today’s key enabler for Web Services. The XML and Web Services security market will reach $4.4 billion in 2006, which will represent 65% of the total authentication, authorization, and administration security market. This growth represents an average compound annual growth rate of 300%. Web Services offer great potential for B2B communication and integration, but the lack of robust security and manageability solutions currently inhibit the ability for companies to conduct business with each other via Web Services over the Internet. The combination of adequate funding, solid business models, seasoned management teams, and high quality engineering staff leads some startups to offer surprisingly robust XML and Web Services security solutions. The best positioned companies to be profitable in the XML and Web Services security space are those companies that already have deep technical knowledge…

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XML & Web Services Security
Security is the immediate roadblock facing widespread implementation of Web Services technologies across the enterprise. As a result, many software vendors are throwing their hat into the XML and Web Services security ring, offering a broad and confusing number of solutions to a variety of real and perceived problems. However, much of this effort amounts to jostling for defensible market positioning ahead of a solid demand for enterprise-class XML and Web Security products and services. As a result, ZapThink believes that the emerging market for XML and Web Services security solutions will be characterized by a period of turbulence, as companies struggle to clarify their messages and shake the kinks out of their product offerings.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $1495[/hide]…

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Service-Oriented Management
Web Services management applications provide software that helps companies manage the systems and applications that underlie their Web Services implementations. The Web Services management products on the market today offer functionality in five basic categories: system management, lifecycle management, business management, security management, and the most important, Service-Oriented Architecture enablement. The latter category is especially important because many Web Services management products provide the critical infrastructure necessary for companies to take their fine-grained, atomic Web Services and other data sources and encapsulate and compose them into coarse-grained business Services that make up a Service-Oriented Architecture. Such architectures offer far more long-term business value than the point-to-point applications of Web Services common today.[hide -2]Download File[/hide][hide +1]Purchase: $1495[/hide]…

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SOA Consulting
Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs) represent an evolutionary approach to distributed computing that promises a flexible IT environment that leads to business agility. As companies look to leverage the business advantages of Web Services to address strategic business needs, they are increasingly looking to build SOAs. However, SOAs require special skills and expertise. When companies do not have such skills in-house, they turn to consultants, system integrators, and other professional services organizations. The movement to SOAs present both opportunities and threats to consulting firms: on the one hand, there will be an increased demand for architectural consulting, business process consulting and the implementation tasks associated with building SOAs. On the other hand, as SOAs take hold and Service-oriented process solutions supplant integration solutions, the market for system integration will dry up, requiring system integrators to change their business focus. This report analyzes the market for SOA within professional services organizations from three…

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Web Services Technologies & Trends
From its inception through 2002, the primary application for Web Services in the enterprise was to simplify point-to-point integration between systems, thereby reducing the cost of integration. This application of Web Services, however, only scratches the surface of the true potential of Web Services — enabling companies to build agile business processes and IT systems that can respond to change through the use of loosely coupled, standards-based Service-oriented architectures. The business value of such architectures in terms of the business agility they provide is substantial, but as of early 2003, only a few early adopter enterprises have built such architectures, partly because few tools for building Service-oriented architectures are available on the market, and furthermore, there is little understanding of the best practices companies should follow to build such architectures. This report seeks to clarify the requirements for realizing the value of Web Services by providing a set of emerging…

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